Homemade Oat Flour

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Learn how to make oat four. It is a very simple process and opens the door to a world of wholesome oat flour baking recipes oat recipes.

One jar of oat flour resting on the bench in front of a container of oats.

Why This Recipe Works

  • One ingredient
  • One step
  • Could not be any easier


Ingredients you will need

  • Traditional Rolled Oats
A soft pink ceramic bowl full of rolled oats resting on the bench next to a small wooden scoop of oats

Ingredient Notes and Substitutes

  • Traditional Rolled Oats: I use traditional rolled oats when I make my oat flour. However you can use quick cook oats or steel cut oats as well. If you are using steel cook oats be aware they take a longer time to process and you may need a commercial grade blender or food processor to get a fine oat flour.


How to make Oat Flour

Below are illustrated step-by-step instructions to make my Homemade Oatmeal Flour recipe, if you prefer just the written instructions then head straight to the printable recipe card below.

Step one: Place your rolled oats in a dry and clean food processor or high speed blender.

A food processor full of oats resting on the bench

Step two: Blitz until a fine powder is achieved. You will need to stop the food processor or blender and scrape the sides of the bowl or jug a few times with a spatula to ensure the oat flour is as fine as possible.

Once you have achieved a fine flour like texture you are done.


A food processor full of blitzed oats resting on the bench


Top Tips & FAQs

Here is how you can make Homemade Oatmeal Flour perfectly every time!

  • There is really nothing to it simply blitz your oats until they are fine.
  • My one tip is to not make use amounts at a time. As it is so quick to make it can be more nutritious to just blitz what you need rather than storing oat flour in an airtight container in your pantry.
  • One cup of rolled oats yields approximately there quarters of a cup of milled oat flour.
  • I do tend to store any extra oat flour I make in a glass jar.
Is oat flour gluten free?

The answer to this will depend on where you live and the guidelines they have in gluten free labelling. The Australian New Zealand Food standards do not allow oats to be labeled gluten free due to the high risk of them being contaminated with gluten containing cereals during processing. 
In some countries such as America there are certified gluten-free oats more readily available. These oats have been processed in a dedicated factory where there is no risk of contamination are able to label their oats gluten free.
Further to this oats contain avenin, a protein similar to gluten. Research shows that one in five individuals with Coeliac Disease react to the avenin in pure, uncontaminated oats. 
People with Coeliac disease should speak with their health care professionals before including uncontaminated oats in their diet.

A food processor full of blitzed oats resting on the bench with a hand holding a small wooden spoon with a scoop of the fine oat flour

One jar of oat flour resting on the bench in front of a container of oats
One jar of oat flour resting on the bench in front of a container of oats.

Homemade Oat Flour

Making oat flour is a quick, single step process that only needs one ingredient!
Print Rate
Course: Baking
Cuisine: New Zealalnd
Keyword: oat flour, homemade oat flour, how to make oat flour
Servings: 3 ½ cup serves
Calories: 205kcal

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Ingredients

  • 2 Cups Traditional Rolled Oats

Instructions

  • Place your rolled oats in a dry and clean food processor or high speed blender.
  • Blitz until a fine powder is achieved. You will need to stop the food processor or blender and scrape the sides of the bowl or jug a few times with a spatula to ensure the oat flour is as fine as possible.

Notes

  • One cup of rolled oats yields approximately there quarters of a cup of milled oat flour. 2 cups of oats yields 1.5 cups of oat flour. 
  • I use traditional rolled oats when I make my oat flour. However you can use quick cook oats or steel cut oats as well. If you are using steel cook oats be aware they take a longer time to process and you may need a commercial grade blender or food processor to get a fine oat flour.
  • There is really nothing to it simply blitz your oats until they are fine.
  • My one tip is to not make use amounts at a time. As it is so quick to make it can be more nutritious to just blitz what you need rather than storing oat flour in an airtight container in your pantry. 
  • I do tend to store any extra oat flour I make in a glass jar. 
  • Oat flour does not behave in the same way as all purpose flour or whole wheat flour in baking. It is highly absorbent, and does not have the glutenous properties of wheat flour. For this reason when you do a straight substitution of plain flour with oat flour the end result can be drier and crumblier than expected. Therefore look for recipes that have been specifically tested with oat flour.

Nutrition

Calories: 205kcal | Carbohydrates: 37g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 4g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 3mg | Potassium: 196mg | Fiber: 5g | Sugar: 1g | Calcium: 28mg | Iron: 2mg

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